Pair of Italian Fruitwood Louis XVI Side Chairs circa 1780 | Antique and Art Exchange

The History of Seating

A dear friend was interested in knowing more about caning. In case you are unfamiliar with this technique, its the weaving of narrow strips of wood or, most commonly, rattan palm into intricate mesh patterns that provide flexible support in a good proportion of antique furniture. It is also worth noting prior to springs and foam, it was not uncommon …

18th Century Portrait of a Beauty | Antique and Art Exchange

Portraits

Long before cameras we see portraits. Paintings in ancient Egypt sometimes replace carved masks on mummies. They are done in “encaustic,” which is a kind of pigmented wax, and has allowed some painting remain brilliant even to present day. The Romans and Etruscan have beautiful fresco paintings that have miraculously survived for about 2000 years. The European Renaissance brings us painting as most of …

Chippendale Revival Settee

Thomas Chippendale

When you hear the word “Chippendale,” chances are it will conjure images of Patrick Swayze and Chris Farley loosely choreographed, gyrating and thrusting. The other famous Chippendale is Thomas Chippendale, who was one of England’s most famous designers and cabinet makers. He published a book of designs (largely the work of Robert Adams) with the backing of John Rannie. This …

George III Tri-Top Mahogany Table c.1770 | Antique and Art Exchange

Metamorphic Furniture

The last part of the 18th century was a time of great innovation in virtually all areas. Much like today, many people were building things that would change the way we live. Metamorphic furniture is particularly interesting instance of innovation. Generally the ideas behind the innovations did not endure but the furniture, although rare, did. A metamorphic piece of furniture …

Fruitwood Chateau Armoire c. 1740 | Antique and Art Exchange

French Armoires

This week we are pleased to feature a beautiful selection of amoires. Many armoires can be as tall as 10 feet. Armoires were originally built for huge, chateau-like homes and are generally themselves reflections of the sheerly enormous spaces for which they were once intended. It is important to make the distinction between the different types of armoires. Such types …